Jon Daiello Product Designer 🦄

#Industry

Journal

2016: The Year of Transition

In 2016, I found myself trying developing existing skill sets, exploring new ones and transitioning into new roles. I didn’t expect so much change, but I’m excited about the new opportunities. I am learning how to grow and effectively handle transition.

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Learning

The Lean Startup

My hope was that this book would help me understand the best way to get products to market. In my new role as a User Experience Designer, I knew I would need to better understand this process.

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Learning

So Good They Can’t Ignore You

I love the career work I do. I design user interfaces and engineer the front-end every day. I’m passionate about doing a great job and making the best possible experience for the user. I always assumed this was because I have an inherent draw to technological development. Well, I was wrong. As Cal Newport explores, I found out that passion only follows great skills.

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Learning

Remote: Office Not Required

Even though I currently spend my days in the office (which is a great experience), there’s still a mountain of information to learn from the concept of working while not actually at work. This doesn’t mean doing work outside of work hours, but rather the idea of doing work (inside work hours) outside of the office building. This concept has been around for a while and it’s becoming a growing trend.

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Journal

Tech Adoption: Life-Blood of Betterment

Call me a fanboy. I’ve probably earned the title. I love researching what’s next and watching to see where technology takes us. Seeing iteration happen in real time throughout our lives is a magical experience. When I see something new, I’m often inclined to jump on the band-wagon and give it a shot. It’s can be an exciting exploration of what’s possible and what’s feasible. Inevitably, I learn something in the process and I am glad I did.

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Journal

False Assumptions

There is a major fault in the way this code define who the users are. In fact, instead of considering the true users it substitutes ourselves for every one of the users. It’s tempting to think that everyone who uses a product is just like me. It’s tempting to think that they understand me. We might even believe it’s safe to assume they think like me.

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